American Cemeteries Around the World

All Gave Some... Some Gave All


Aisne-Marne American CemeteryThe Aisne-Marne American Cemetery and Memorial is a 42-acre (170,000 m2) cemetery in Belleau, Northern France which is home to the graves of 2289 members of the United States military who died in World War I.  It is located at the foot of the hill where the Battle of Belleau Wood was fought, with many American fatalities.  The cemetery also contains burials from the Battle of Château-Thierry, later that summer.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.


Ardennes American CemeteryThe Ardennes American Cemetery and Memorial at Ardennes, Belgium is home to the graves of 5329 members of the United States military who died in World War II.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.


The St. James American Cemetery at Brittany, France is home to the graves of 4410 members of the United States military who died in the Normandy Invasion of World War II.


There are 4,410 American military personnel buried in the cemetery.  Their 4,408 headstones are set in 16 fan-shaped plots, curving from the central mall.  The dead came from every state in the Union and the District of Columbia. Ninety-five of the headstones mark graves of "unknowns;" two of these graves contain the remains of two Unknowns that could not be separated.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Brookwood American CemeteryThe Brookwood American Cemetery and Memorial is the only American Military Cemetery of World War I in the British Isles.  It is home to the graves of 468 members of the United States military.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Cambridge American CemeteryThe Cambridge American Cemetery in Cambridge, England has approximately 3,812 graves of servicemen, including airmen who died over Europe and sailors from North Atlantic convoys.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.


Epinal American CemeteryThe Epinal American Cemetery and Memorial is a 48.6-acre (19.7 ha) site which rests on a plateau 100 feet (30 m) above the Moselle River in the foothills of the Vosges Mountains in Dinozé, France.  It contains the graves of 5,255 United States' military dead, most of whom lost their lives in the campaigns across northeastern France to the Rhine and beyond into Germany during World War II.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Flanders Field American CemeteryThe Flanders Field American Cemetery and Memorial occupies a six-acre site which lies on the southeast edge of the town of Waregem, Belgium.  At this peaceful location rest 368 American military Dead, most of whom gave their lives in liberating Belgium in World War I.

Source:  IAgenweb.org.


Florence American CemeteryThe Florence American Cemetery and Memorial is about 7.5 miles (12 kilometers) south of Florence, in Tuscany, Italy, about two miles south of the Certosa-Florence exit of the Rome-Milan autoroute.  It covers about 70 acres, chiefly on the west side of the Greve river, framed by wooded hills.  It is home to 4402 members of the United States military.  Most of those buried here are from the Fifth Army who died in the fighting that followed the capture of Rome in June 1944; others fell in the heavy fighting in the Apennines between then and 2 May, 1945.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Henri-Chapelle American CemeteryThe The Henri-Chapelle American Cemetery and Memorial lies approximately 30 kilometers east of Liège, Belgium and contains the graves of 7,992 members of the American military who died in World War II.  It is one of three American war cemeteries in Belgium.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Lorraine American CemeteryThe Lorraine American Cemetery and Memorial is located just outside of Saint-Avold, Moselle, France.  It covers 113.5 acres (0.459 km2) and contains 10,489 graves; the largest number of graves of any American World War II cemetery in Europe.  Those interred died mostly in the autumn of 1944 during the Drive to the Siegfried Line and were mainly part of the U.S. Third and Seventh Armies.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Luxembourg American CemeteryThe Luxembourg American Cemetery and Memorial is located in Luxembourg City, Luxembourg.  The cemetery, which is 50.5 acres (204,000 m2) in extent contains the remains of 5,076 American service members.  On 22 occasions two brothers rest side-by-side in adjacent graves.  Most of the interred died during the Battle of the Bulge which was fought nearby in winter 1944/spring 1945.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Manilla American CemeteryThe Manilla American Cemetery and Memorial is located in in Fort Bonifacio, Taguig City in Metro Manila, Philippines.  The cemetery, 152 acres (0.62 km2) or 615,000 square metres in area, is located on a prominent plateau, visible at a distance from the east, south and west.  With a total of 17,206 graves, it is the largest cemetery in the Pacific for U.S. personnel killed during World War II, and also holds war dead from the Philippines and other allied nations.  Many of the personnel whose remains are interred or represented were killed in New Guinea, or during the Battle of the Philippines (1941-42) or the Allied recapture of the islands.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Meuse-Argonne American CemeteryThe Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial is a 130.5-acre (0.528 km2) World War I cemetery in France.  It is located east of the village of Romagne-sous-Montfaucon in Meuse.  The cemetery contains the largest number of American military dead in Europe (14,246), most of whom lost their lives during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Sicily-Rome American CemeteryAt the Mexico City National Cemetery there are 750 American soldiers buried that were killed during the Mexican War.  Their remains were gathered in 1851, four years after the war, and buried in a common grave at this cemetery.  They were not identified so they are classified as unknown soldiers.  In addition there are eight veterans of the Mexican War buried at this cemetery.

Source:  American Battle Monuments Commission..

Netherlands American CemeteryThe Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial is a World War II cemetery which lies in the village of Margraten six miles east of Maastricht, in the most southern part of The Netherlands.

The walls on either side of the Court of Honor contain the Tablets of the Missing on which are recorded the names of 1,722 American missing who gave their lives in the service of their country and who rest in unknown graves.  Beyond the chapel and tower is the burial area which is divided into sixteen plots.  Here rest 8,301 American dead, most of whom lost their lives nearby.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Normandy American CemeteryThe Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial is a World War II cemetery and memorial in Colleville-sur-Mer, Normandy, France, that honors American soldiers who died in Europe during World War II.  The cemetery is located on a bluff overlooking Omaha Beach (one of the landing beaches of the Normandy Invasion) and the English Channel.  It covers 172 acres (70 ha), and contains the remains of 9,387 American military dead, most of whom were killed during the invasion of Normandy and ensuing military operations in World War II.  Included are graves of Army Air Force crews shot down over France as early as 1942.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Oise-Aisne American CemeteryThe Oise-Aisne Cemetery and Memorialis an American military cemetery in northern France.  Plots A through D contains the graves of 6,012 American soldiers who died while fighting in this vicinity during World War I, 597 of which were not identified, as well as a monument for 241 Americans who were missing in action during battles in the same area and whose remains were never recovered.  Most of the 6,012 soldiers and support personnel honorably interred at this site died fighting during the Second Battle of the Marne and the Oise-Aisne campaign

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Rhone American CemeteryThe Rhone American Cemetery and Memorial is an American war cemetery in Southern France, memorializing 861 American soldiers and mariners who died in Second World War operations in that area.  The cemetery covers 12 acres (49,000 m2) within the city of Draguignan.  The cemetery is named for the Rhone river and its watershed, where most of those interred fought and died.  Those interred were mainly part of the U.S. Seventh Army, in particular the US 45th Infantry Division, the US 36th Infantry Division, and the US 3rd Infantry Division. They died mostly in the summer of 1944 during Operation Dragoon, the Allied invasion of Southern France from the Mediterranean, which followed the Allied invasion of Normandy.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Sicily-Rome American CemeteryThe Sicily-Rome American Cemetery and Memorial lies at the north edge of the town of Nettuno, Italy, which is immediately east of Anzio, 38 miles south of Rome.  The cemetery covers 77 acres, rising in a gentle slope from a broad pool with an island and cenotaph flanked by groups of Italian cypress trees. Beyond the pool is the immense field of headstones of 7,861 of American military war dead, arranged in gentle arcs on broad green lawns beneath rows of Roman pines. The majority of these men died in the liberation of Sicily (July 10 to August 17, 1943); in the landings in the Salerno Area (September 9, 1943) and the heavy fighting northward; in the landings at Anzio Beach and expansion of the beachhead (January 22, 1944 to May 1944); and in air and naval support in the regions.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Somme American CemeteryThe Somme American Cemetery and Memorial in France is sited in the commune of Bony, on a gentle slope typical of the open, rolling Picardy countryside, in northern France.  The 14.3-acre (58,000 m2) cemetery contains the graves of 1,844 of the United States' military dead from World War I.  Most lost their lives while serving in American units attached to the British Army, or in operations near Cantigny.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

St_Mihiel American CemeteryThe St. Mihiel American Cemetery and Memorial in France, 40.5 acres (164,000 m2) in extent, contains the graves of 4,153 of American military dead from World War I.  The majority of these died in the offensive that resulted in the reduction of the St. Mihiel salient that threatened Paris.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.

Suresnes American CemeteryThe Suresnes American Cemetery and Memorial is a United States military cemetery in the Suresnes (Hauts-de-Seine), France.  It is located in a suburb of Paris on the southeastern slope of the hill below Fort Mont Valerien.  Originally a World War I cemetery, it now shelters the remains of U.S. dead of both wars.  The 7.5-acre (30,000 m2) cemetery contains the remains of 1,541 Americans who died in World War I and 24 Unknown dead of World War II.  Bronze tablets on the walls of the chapel record the names of 974 World War I missing. Rosettes mark the names of those since recovered and identified.

Source:  Wikipedia.org.



References:

1 American Battle Monuments Commission